Frost is a good thing

Well, I admit I’m a little bummed at the late arrival of winter. Typically, I prefer the opportunity to shoot a fresh coating of snow than I do left-over autumn.

What's  this flower's name? Any ideas.

What’s this flower’s name? Any ideas.

But, once in a while we’re given a gift and this morning’s frost-covered landscape was just such a gift. I had just started my morning walk, wasn’t even past my front yard when I happened to notice a frost covered wildflower in my crystalized lawn . . . as close to snow as we’ve gotten this year. I knew that if I didn’t forego my morning walk I’d come back and the frost would be gone.

So, instead, I made a beeline for the back of my truck where I keep a rolled-up, six-foot length of plastic carpet runner, and then back into the house for my camera and tripod. The wildflower (sorry, despite my best effort I could not find this flower in any of my wildflower books) is only about three inches tall, so I had to get down on my belly.

I love the frost around the leaf's edges.

I love the frost around the leaf’s edges.

I worked on several angles before my attention was attracted to a frost-tipped leaf delicately imbedded in the nearby frost-covered grasses. I adjusted my aperture to f8, looking for the leaf and foreground grasses to be in focus with a soft background to help emphasize the leaf and the layer of frost around its edges.

Then, thinking I might still be able to get in a short walk, I grabbed my carpet runner, camera and tripod and started back to the truck. But, another autumn hold-over caught my eye as I walked past the Christmas decorations I had only put up yesterday. It’s amazing how beautiful a dead, brown, curled maple leave and be. Add

I took an angle on the leaf to accentuate the veins fanning throughout the image . . . leading my eye to expore.

I took an angle on the leaf to accentuate the veins fanning throughout the image . . . leading my eye to expore.

a little frost and what landscape photographer wouldn’t have to stop and give it a go. So, with the plastic unrolled, once again I was on my face working my way into position for my kind of frosty.

But, now that I had stopped, why not take a couple snaps  of my decorations. I really liked how the frost had added a pleasing texture and, combined with the lines on the bulb it proved an invitation that

Maybe not a landscape image but the frost let's me  call it nature.  Right?

Maybe not a landscape image but the frost let’s me call it nature. Right?

leads my eye to a frosty red ribbon in the background. I liked how the arching diagonals sees to be corralled by the lines of the bow, likes outstretched arms.

Again, it is the texture of the frost that makes this image work for me, coupled with the diagonal lines of  the leaf.

Again, it is the texture of the frost that makes this image work for me, coupled with the diagonal lines of the leaf.

It’s a good thing I don’t have a larger yard (not) because before I could get to the truck I was once again captivated by the brittle texture of the frosted grasses at my feet, this time with a beech leaf (I think) comfortably nestled in a pose that could not be passed up.

It was only an hour, but already the areas of the yard in direct sunlight were loosing their frost. I felt like the walk could come later . . . maybe tomorrow.