Don’t bother to shoot this time of year…

… it’s too drab and lacking in color. How many times have we heard that, or something like it? I’m not one to not take my cameras out unless I’m facing really photogenic weather or seasonal conditions, however.

Our first color.

Our first color.

There’s a special satisfaction coming home with a “keeper” or two when the conditions seem to conspire against you. That might mean the trees have yet to leaf out. It might be a day with a blanket of thick dark clouds. Then again, we (I typically enjoy shooting with friends) could find ourselves under cloudless, high contrast skies. These are all occasions or conditions that often keep some photographers indoors or at least leaving their cameras indoors.

This weekend we were met with a weather forecast that was gloomy, gloomy and more gloomy. Fortunately, for us, the forecast spelled opportunity. I can’t say we were looking forward foul weather. But, as we drove toward the Ithaca area with a little spritz here and there, and fast moving clouds racing

Naked trees of spring against crashing waters of Ithaca Falls.

Naked trees of spring against crashing waters of Ithaca Falls.

across the horizon, we weren’t thinking of anything but finding something to shoot.

As we came down the Rt. 13 hill into the northeast side of Ithaca, we caught a glimpse of willow trees reflecting in Cayuga Lake on the shore of Stewart Park.While this was supposed to be a tour to photograph waterfalls, we couldn’t resist the scene that caught our eye.  It took us a few minutes to find a vantage point from which to shoot and within moments we had our first catch of the day.

All the color is in the water or beneath it.

All the color is in the water or beneath it.

From Stewart Park our next challenge would be Ithaca Falls. It really only occurs to me now that I didn’t actually photograph the falls themselves. Rather, I became engrossed by the fact that while the calendar says it’s spring, the scene of leafless trees standing bare and stark against the falls belied that fact.  My challenge became to find something worth composing out of a tangle of naked trees silhouetted

As we were leaving this simple cascade and a temporary balancing tree trunk beckoned a final capture. Our attention was first drawn by the color of the creek bed above the cascade.

As we were leaving this simple cascade and a temporary balancing tree trunk beckoned a final capture. Our attention was first drawn by the color of the creek bed above the cascade.

against the white crashing waterfalls in the background. Not colorful by most standard, but not drab by any standard either.

Then it was off to Taughannock Falls. Our last visit there had been in January. Again it would have been mostly described as colorless, except for the color white. This weekend we found plenty of color, reflecting from the stoney floor of the creek, as well as the blue sky reflecting deep in the cascading waters.

So, my recommendation? Never take anyone’s advise who tells you not to bother shooting because it’s too drab.