Artful Winter at Camp Uncas

IN PRESERVING ADIRONDACKS GREAT CAMPS PATRICIA LEIGH BROWN TOLD US “IN 1869, A YOUNG CLERGYMAN, THE REV. WILLIAM H. H. MURRAY, WROTE A BOOK ENTITLED “ADVENTURES IN THE WILDERNESS; OR CAMP-LIFE IN THE ADIRONDACKS.” “THE WILDERNESS,” HE OBSERVED, “PROVIDES THAT PERFECT RELAXATION WHICH ALL JADED MINDS REQUIRE.”

An Adirondack Winter sunset

An Adirondack Winter sunset

Well, excuse me Ms. Brown if I paraphrase (in other words steal) yours and Mr. Murray’s thoughts for my own service. The Wilderness provides the perfect relaxation which all jaded nature photographers need.”

That said, I’m really pleased to announce the first-ever nature photography retreat at the historic Great Camp Uncas five miles off the beaten path (so to speak) in Raquette Lake, NY.

Wintry Buttermilk Falls-1396

Lines, textures, shapes.

This historically significant Adirondack Great Camp was completed in 1895 by Adirondack developer and promoter W. W. (William West) Durant. What makes it extra-special is the wonderful history, being surrounded by a work of art that constantly pleases the senses. I also hasten to suggest its wonderful history, architecture and magnificent wilderness setting would be hard, if even possible, to find a better spot for a weekend of winter photography.

While I’ve had the pleasure of shooting at Camp Uncas and nearby Camp Sagamore during the summer and fall but never during the winter. That said, years photographing the winter landscape in the Adirondacks encourages me to really look forward to our February weekend (February 5-7, 2016) at Camp Uncas.

Our accommodations will be in a newly renovated “out-building” overlooking the 60-acre Mohegan Lake where we’ll eat, sleep and, oh yes, review our images.

Our weekend will surely whet our appetites for Adirondack winter photography but also give us the opportunity to challenge our artistic instincts. We’ll develop our winter compositions viewing the pristine winter landscape not as snow, winter pines and ice, but as shapes, lines, textures and that magic Adirondack light. The result? Our own artful winter images.

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