Adirondacks and spring – made for photography

A lot of people are ready to put winter behind them, bemoaning our colder and, seemingly at least, snowier than usual winter. I don’t think anyone will argue that that pretty much defines February, at least. If for no other reason, I think this justifies looking forward to the upcoming Adirondack Streams and Waterfalls Photo Trek 2015Hopefully, by the scheduled dates for this photo/workshop, April 22-26, winter will be history.

Some picturesque waterfalls only appear following the thaw of winter and the arrival of spring.

Some picturesque waterfalls only appear following the thaw of winter and the arrival of spring.

It’s often a contest between winter and spring this time of year, especially in the Adirondacks. That fact should get the juices of any nature photographer flowing. When else can you hope to encounter the last snow, even some potential for fresh snow, and early wildflowers?

For certain, we’ll encounter mud (it is mud season after all), so we’ll want to be prepared for getting a little dirty. We’ll also want to be prepared for the

In case we aren't  having enough fun . . . we can always try a Blue/Gold polarizer and enjoy its affect on fast flowing water.

In case we aren’t having enough fun . . . we can always try a Blue/Gold polarizer and enjoy its affect on fast flowing water.

opportunities mud season can present . . . muddy banks and icy shorelines may also feature the designs of underwater formations. Close-ups of budding spring leaves or young, early wildflowers can also make pleasing, even exciting compositions.

I suspect most of those planning on enjoying the late April workshop, are really enthusiastic about opportunities to photograph the Adirondack Mountain streams that should be high and flowing fast. I also expect that waterfalls will feature massive amounts of crashing water. So, we’ll want to be prepared to capitalize with wide angles, long exposures and interesting perspectives. So, while our wide angle lenses will get a workout, we won’t want to forget our neutral density filters either.

I've been captivated by the whitewater contrasting with large boulders on Big Moose Lake outlet.

I’ve been captivated by the whitewater contrasting with large boulders on Big Moose Lake outlet.

And, high boots or even waders will be the appropriate fashion for those who want to try a perspective on either the streams or the waterfalls that might be more interesting from a point of view that requires being in the water and not just on its banks.

When we happen onto those early spring buds or wildflowers that same wide angle lens might come into play again. However, we’ll be smart, too, if we put our macro lenses, diopters or even reversing rings in our camera bags for this trip.

With all this working for us, how can we not be looking forward to April?

Ice out on the Racquette River. You'll want your polarizer for this one.

Ice out on the Racquette River. You’ll want your polarizer for this one.

And, you know what? One of those things we’re not likely to have to worry about with an early spring photo shoot is bugs. A month later those pesky Adirondack black flies could well be out in force and they’ve been known to hang around well into June. So, between now and summer, the Adirondack Streams and Waterfalls Photo Trek 2015 is one you don’t want to miss.

Even a simple peel of birch bark can become a prized composition.

Even a simple peel of birch bark can become a prized composition.

Registrations are coming in already. We cannot accommodate more than eight participants so if you are interested in joining us, now would be a good time to visit the Adirondack Streams and Waterfalls Photo Trek 2015 page on my website to get more information and then click on the “Register Now” link to confirm a seat for yourself.

The Adirondacks and the Long Lake area in particular offer exciting opportunities for photography.

Next up? Spring.